Seed Tape in 3 Varieties - Seed

Petroselinum crispum var. crispum 'Moskrul' + Beta vulgaris 'Kogel' + Raphanus sativus 'Saxa' 
Seed Tape in 3 Varieties

Prepare your own healthy meal!

Beetroot 'Kogel' (Beta vulgaris) is easily stored and is rich in vitamins - seed tape: 5 M.
Parsley 'Moskrul' (Petroslinum crispum var. crispum) is a compact grower with delicate curly leaves - seed tape: 7.5 M.
Radish 'Saxa' (Raphanus sativus) has a lovely round shape with very tender flesh - seed tape: 7.5 M.
Each seed tape is easily cut to the desired length.
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5-12 Working Days
Details
£ 7.75
£ 8.25  

  • Free delivery
  • Planting
  • Parsley, radish and beetroot seed tapes need no prior treatment  - the seed tapes are ready to use.
    Sowing
    Sowing radishes in the garden, choose a sunny spot, March through to August (from February if using a cold frame).

    For parsley, choose a shady spot, April through to July (full sun will wither the leaves or they could turn yellow).

    Beetroot needs a sunny spot, March through to May (from February if using a cold frame).

    It's a good idea to sow (half) a row of each seed every couple of weeks to give you a harvest almost throughout the year. Fork the soil loose to at least 30 cm. Draw a furrow 1 cm deep and label the row. Lay the seed tape and cut off at the correct length. Cover with 0.5 cm soil, press carefully down and sprinkle with water. Extra rows, 20 cm apart.

    The radish seeds will germinate in 6-14 days. The beetroot seeds will germinate in 14-21 days. The parsley seeds will germinate in 28-35 days.
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  • Care
  • Radishes do not require additional fertiliser the improve their quality. Water all three plant types extra in periods of drought and keep the beds free of weeds. This will promote good healthy growth of your parsley, radishes and beetroot.

    Parsley tends not to flower in the first year but if it should shoot, just cut out the flower stem entirely.

    Beetroot can use some extra fertiliser (a sprinkling of granulated cow manure), especially potassium once they're growing well.
    Harvesting
    Pick your parsley by the base of the stem from the outer parts of the plant, leaving the centre of the plant to mature. Using scissors or a sharp knife is recommended - be careful when pinching out with finger and thumb as it is easy to pull the plant up. Do not pick too much from one plant. Harvest as long as the plant continues to makes new leaf and you will be able to pick from the same plant(s) for months on end.

    Always harvest the biggest radishes, allowing the smaller ones to keep growing. Carefully pull up individuals, or use a small trowel to loosen the soil around each one. Radishes are ready to pick early in the season.

    Always harvest the biggest beets, allowing the smaller ones to keep growing. Carefully pull up individuals, or use a small trowel to loosen the soil around each one. Early sown beetroot is ready to pick early in the season.
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  • Specifics
  • Originally from the regions around the Mediterranean, Parsley (Petroselinum crispum var. crispum) is a biennial plant that is actually, mostly grown as an annual as the plant tends to flower in year two. When winters are mild it is often possible to still harvest from the plant.

    Parsley is really good for you as the leaves contain lots of vitamin A and C and is known for purifying the blood.

    These radishes (Raphanus sativus 'Saxa') grow into lovely globes which are red on the outside and white, juicy and crispy on the inside.

    Beetroot (Beta vulgaris 'Kogel) are a beautiful red inside and out.
    Use
    Having harvested your parsley, it is best to take the curled leaf from the stems (the stems can certainly be used but they are somewhat tougher). Finley chop the leaves and add to your recipes. Use raw in salads and salsas too. Also a sprig of parsley makes a lovely garnish on soups and various dishes. Did you know that chewing parsley covers the smell of garlic on your breath?

    Freeze small amounts of parsley, just big enough for one meal, by sprinkling chopped leaves into an ice cube form and freezing them into cubes. Transfer into a resealable plastic bag and you will always have some handy when working in the kitchen. You could also try drying it and then storing it in an airtight container.

    Radishes will keep for up to 10 days in the fridge. Great in salads or eaten like an apple. Rinse off, bite!

    Beetroot will certainly last a few days in the fridge. Stored whole in damp sand in a cool, frost-free area they can even last for several months. It is actually very handy to pickle them in vinegar (with some sugar between layers of slices) and spices for long term storage. Boil them in their skins (easily removed once tender) then eat warm or cold, sliced or grated. Great in salads, lovely with a warm meal too.
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  • Extra information
  • Latin name Petroselinum crispum var. crispum 'Moskrul' + Beta vulgaris 'Kogel' + Raphanus sativus 'Saxa'  
    Guarantee 100% growth and flowering guarantee
    Scented not scented
    Flowers for cutting no
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