Intenz Home® Boston Fern 'Duffi' - Plant

Nephrolepis exaltata 'Duffi'
Intenz Home® Boston  Fern  'Duffi'

Helps purify the air!

 
 
 
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Late March
Details
£ 6.50

  • Planting
  • Supplied in a standard nursery pot. Pot up to a larger planter using humus-rich potting compost. Or stand the pot as it is in an attractive planter. A saucer is fine too. Water may be allowed to stay in the saucer as it evaporates or is absorbed. Water again only when saucer is empty.

    Choose a warm place for your sword fern (Nephrolepsis exaltata) bright but with no direct sunlight on the plant and preferably not below 15 degrees Celsius. The plant will require less water in cooler surroundings.
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  • Care
  • The Green Lady fern (Nephrolepis exaltata) 'Green Lady' is a plant native to tropical forests where it grows in shaded conditions and really does not like direct sunlight! The Green Lady fern is easy to grow indoors and needs a high level of humidity so we recommend misting the leaves regularly with rainwater. If the air is too dry, the edges of the leaves will dry and curl. This plant does not like too strong a fertiliser, so we recommend halving the dosage suggested on dry or liquid fertiliser packets for green plant houseplants.
    Water less in the winter keeping the plant slightly drier. Wait until spring to resume watering and feeding.
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  • Specifics
  • Nephrolepis exaltata is a tropical variety, native to tropical Asia and the Amazon forests where it even grows on tree branches and rocks in humid conditions (epiphytic).

    Nephrolepsis now have their own family - Nephrolepidaceae.
    Sick Building Syndrome
    The harmful gas particles in the house, such as benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene are solvents and are often used in the production of chipboard and other wood household items such as kitchen cabinets and other pieces of furniture - or perhaps even as cleaning agents. These items of furniture often need time to disperse the gases contained in them and are often still dispersing when they already been placed in our homes and offices. This can often lead to a bad atmosphere that can cause headaches either in the home or at the office and the phenomenon is known as 'Sick Building Syndrome'.
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